HomeSouth CarolinaSC authorities will start issuing fines for so-called “squatted” vehicles starting May...

SC authorities will start issuing fines for so-called “squatted” vehicles starting May 10

South Carolina – South Carolina drivers who like the “Carolina Squat” might want to reconsider their vehicle modifications and think again about bringing their vehicles back to normal. The grace period is almost over, and soon the state will start enforcing new rules that could cost people money. In May of last year, Governor Henry McMaster signed Senate Bill 363 into law. This bill specifically targets cars that have undergone changes to the Carolina Squat style.

This modification involves altering the vehicle’s suspension, raising or lowering the front fenders. Some drivers prefer their vehicles this way, but it has also sparked safety concerns. Senate Bill 363 prohibits drivers from operating vehicles that have their front fenders raised or lowered four or more inches from the height of their rear fender.

The bill was passed with little opposition in both houses, which shows that most lawmakers agree that rules are needed for safety improvements. The law went into force in November of the previous year. However, police have been lenient, only issuing warning tickets to drivers who violated the rules during a six-month grace period.

This grace period is going to end on May 10, Friday. As of May 10, cops will start giving out fines that start at $100. The penalties will increase with each offense, and after the third offense, the drivers risk losing their license.

The rule is similar to what neighboring states North Carolina and Virginia have already done, which is to ban the Carolina Squat. Authorities in these states argue that the modification can obstruct the driver’s view over the dashboard, posing a risk not only to the drivers themselves, but also to others on the road.

Read also: Battle over budget priorities in South Carolina

Drivers in South Carolina who have modified their cars in this way have less than a month to make the necessary adjustments to avoid fines. The goal of this law is to improve safety.

Previous announcement

On November 10, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety issued the following statement:

So-called “squatted” vehicles will be illegal to operate on South Carolina roads when a new law takes effect on November 12.

Under the new law (SC Code Section 56-5-4445), “squatted” vehicles include those with a front or rear fender raised four or more inches higher than the other.

SC law enforcement will only issue warning citations for the first six months, after which drivers will begin to receive tickets. The first offense is a misdemeanor and will result in a $100 fine. On the third offense, violators will be fined $300 and lose their driving privileges for one year.

For more information on this and other SC traffic laws, visit: www.scdps.sc.gov/DrivinginSC

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